Planning Zones and Overlays

Green Wedge Zone

What is the Green Wedge Zone?

The Green Wedge Zone (GWZ) intends to recognise, protect and conserve rural areas on the urban fringe for its character. This means farming activities are generally encouraged in the GWZ as are other sustainable land management activities. It can also mean that non-agricultural development is discouraged.

When is a planning permit usually required?

A planning permit might be needed for the following use and development types in the GWZ:

  • Most non-agricultural (and more intense agricultural) activities and their associated buildings 

  • New dwelling (which may not always be approved) – only one house can be on a lot.

  • Most subdivisions, although there are restrictions on how small a lot may divided into

New development is generally restricted in the GWZ. A permit may also be triggered by an overlay or particular provision.

What may not need a planning permit?

The following might not require a permit:

  • Some small-scale farming uses (although planning scheme conditions must be met to avoid a permit)

  • New buildings or earthworks for a use that does not need a permit

  • Renovations or small extensions to an existing house.

Always check if a permit is required under an overlay or particular provision.

Is anything not allowed in the GWZ?

Two or more dwelling, most other forms of residential use, many industries, all offices, most retailing and many other uses are not allowed in the Green Wedge.

What do I need to include in my planning permit application?

If your application is for a new building (including a dwelling), an extension to a current building or another development then the following will generally be required:

  • Site plans, showing key features of the site – features of adjoining properties close to the boundary, access roads and road reserves should be shown

  • Elevation plans including floor levels, boundary setbacks, building design and earthworks

  • Floor plans, detailing setbacks from boundaries and layouts may be required

If your application is for a land use in the GWZ,  the following are needed:

  • Traffic and vehicle movements 

  • Numbers of patrons and hours of operation 

  • Layout of the land, and how different parts of the land will be used

  • Additional noise or smell impacts, particularly those which may impact neighbours

  • Types of land uses in the surrounding area, particularly near residential land

Mornington Peninsula Shire has additional specific requirements for dwellings within the Green Wedge Zone. Further information on this can be accessed at: Green Wedge Management Plan - Mornington Peninsula Shire (mornpen.vic.gov.au)

Are there any specific requirements?

In many applications, a planning report and other consulting reports should be submitted. Additional reports could be land capability assessments, vegetation analysis or many others. Most GWZ lots do not include reticulated sewerage – effluent disposal must be considered in these situations.

Planning applications for seemingly minor activities in the GWZ can be difficult, so it is recommended to speak with council before spending extensive time or money on an idea.

 

 

Vegetation Protection Overlay

What is the Vegetation Protection Overlay?

The Vegetation Protection Overlay (VPO) protects significant vegetation and directs development to minimise the loss of existing trees and other vegetation. Local ‘schedules’ include a statement of the vegetation’s significance and any vegetation protection objectives to be achieved. The schedule describes those factors and how they must be considered when decisions are made.

When is a planning permit usually required?

A planning permit is generally required for:

  • Removing, destroying or lopping any protected vegetation 

  • This might include groundcover vegetation or shrubs, so it is recommended to check the local schedule closely

  • In some instances, a new building or earthworks within a tree protection zone for protected vegetation may require a planning permit (to make sure the tree’s health may not be negatively impacted)

What may not need a planning permit?

The best way to avoid needing a planning permit in the VPO is to avoid removing vegetation or building within tree protection zones of protected trees or vegetation. Often new buildings or earthworks away from protected trees or other vegetation avoid the need for a planning permit.

There is a list of exemptions within the planning scheme that might avoid the need for a planning permit, as might the local schedule have some exemptions.

Is anything not allowed in the VPO?

While specific development is not ‘prohibited’ in a VPO, approval to remove significant vegetation can be difficult without good reasons. Often councils prefer that the trees and vegetation are retained with new development designed and located accordingly.

What do I need to include in my planning permit application?

Within the VPO, all trees and vegetation must generally be shown on a site plan. Often an arborist report must accompany an application. The specific requirements will depend on the vegetation significance, therefore other reports or plans may be required for submission.

Are there any specific requirements?

The statement of the nature and significance of the vegetation to be protected must be responded to and considered. This might need particular reports prepared

 

Schedule 1 to the VPO

To what areas does schedule 1 to the VPO apply?

This schedule – known as the VPO1 – applies to a wide variety of areas through the Shire where substantial vegetation cover, rather than built form, is the dominant visual and environmental feature. 

What are the vegetation protection objectives for the VPO1?

The objectives of the VPO1 seek to identify areas where substantial vegetation cover is the dominate visual and environmental feature, to protect and conserve native vegetation and the habitat value of vegetation and ensure that any new development, including subdivision, has appropriate regard to the vegetated and environmental character.

Are there specific permit requirements for new buildings, land uses or other development in the VPO1?

The VPO1 requires a planning permit to remove, destroy or lop any vegetation. While the VPO1 does not require a permit for the development of buildings/structures or the use of land, the objectives and guidelines of the VPO1 will be considered, including whether development has proper regard to the established landscape character and strikes an appropriate balance between vegetation and built form, whether retained vegetation can be protected from damage during development, and whether native vegetation can be conserved by alternative means of siting buildings and works.

What may not need a planning permit?

There are a small number of permit exemptions for vegetation removal listed under the VPO1, including for the development or maintenance of driveways, some new buildings, general pruning and maintenance, vegetation established for less than 10 years, and vegetation presenting an immediate risk to life or property.

It is important to note that exemptions may have specific requirements to be satisfied in order for the exemption to apply, and advice should be sought as to whether an exemption is applicable to your proposal.

Are there any specific application requirements in the VPO1?

An application must be accompanied by a vegetation management plan clearly indicating: 

  • All existing vegetation on the site, the extent and purpose of proposed vegetation removal and the species, density and location of trees and vegetation to be planted. 

  • The location of any watercourse on the property, and, if relevant the location of areas where the ground slope exceeds 20 per cent. 

Where it is proposed to relocate a building, the application must specify the intended access route and provide an assessment of the vegetation impact, both on the site and on road reserves, including any proposed replanting. 

Are there any specific decision guidelines in the VPO1?

The decision guidelines of the VPO1 include the objectives of this schedule, the value of the vegetation to be lost in relation to its habitat, landscape and environmental values, age physical condition, rarity or variety, the need for an arboricultural report prepared by a suitably qualified professional, the impact of vegetation removal on the stability of the site, whether there are reasonable alternative means of siting buildings and works to avoid the loss of vegetation.

 

Schedule 2 to the VPO

To what areas does schedule 2 to the VPO apply?

This schedule – known as the VPO2 – applies to significant treelines which form important habitat and landscape elements to the Mornington Peninsula. Many tree lines, including those composed of non-indigenous trees, such as Monterey or Radiata Pines, are culturally significant elements of the Peninsula landscape.  

What are the vegetation protection objectives for the VPO2?

The objectives of the VPO2 seeks to protect and conserve native vegetation and habitat areas, maintains the high landscape quality of roadsides and other areas, maintains and enhances the habitat value and corridor function of treelines, recognises the cultural and landscape significance of all treelines and ensures appropriate replacement planting.

Are there specific permit requirements for new buildings, land uses or other development in the VPO2?

The VPO2 requires a planning permit to remove, destroy or lop any vegetation. 

While the VPO2 does not require a permit for the development of buildings/structures or the use of land, the objectives and guidelines of the VPO2 will be considered, including whether vegetation can be retained by alternative means of siting buildings and works.

What may not need a planning permit?

There are a small number of permit exemptions for vegetation removal listed under the VPO2, including for the development or maintenance of driveways, some new buildings, the removal of dead branches (not entire trees), and vegetation presenting an immediate risk to life or property.

Are there any specific application requirements in the VPO2?

An application must be accompanied by: 

  • The total extent of vegetation on the property and the extent of proposed clearing.

  • The location of any watercourse on the property, and, if relevant, the location of areas where the ground slope exceeds 20 percent. 

  • The purpose of the proposed clearing and any proposals for revegetation, including proposed species, and ground stabiliztation. 

  • The location of any watercourse on the property, and, if relevant the location of areas where the ground slope exceeds 20 per cent. 

Are there any specific decision guidelines in the VPO2?

The decision guidelines of the VPO2 include the objectives of this schedule, any relevant regional catchment strategy or regional vegetation plan, the cultural landscape value and visual prominence of the treeline, botanical and environmental value of the treeline, the extent to which the tree line forms part of a habitat area or habitat corridor and the need to maintain the connectivity of habitat corridors, the need for an arboricultural report prepared by a suitably qualified professional, the impact of vegetation removal on the stability of the site, and whether there are reasonable alternative means of siting buildings and works to conserve the vegetation and better meet the objectives of this schedule.

 

Design and Development Overlay

What is the Design and Development Overlay?

The Design and Development Overlay (DDO) identifies areas where new buildings have requirements relating to their design. Many DDOs have guidance for the future built form and may guide a transition within an activity centre or other key part of a local community. DDOs are often used to implement structure plans or other strategic policies from councils. Owing to this, the local schedule is important in understanding a DDO.

When is a planning permit usually required?

As mentioned above, the local schedule is important when reviewing what types of activities require a planning permit. Generally, a new building will require a planning permit, although a local schedule may only require a planning permit if over a specific height, a certain colour, or other requirement. Some local DDO schedules have specific rules for fences, and some types of application may be suitable for a fast-track VicSmart assessment. Most subdivision requires a planning permit too. It is helpful to have an early discuss with council to better understand the DDO.

What may not need a planning permit?

Most land uses that are allowed within the zone, will not need a planning permit in the DDO. Local schedules outline the types of buildings and construction that do not require a planning permit within the DDO. 

Is anything not allowed in the DDO?

While no land uses or specific development are ‘prohibited’ in the DDO, councils often have specific policies and guidance on how new buildings must be designed. It is recommended to speak with council about this early – if the local rules have not been considered, approval may not be issued.

What do I need to include in my planning permit application?

Given the different building design matters for which a DDO might need a permit, it is recommended to check the local schedule and with the council before progressing too far with a proposal. The schedule often includes specific information to be submitted. 

The specific requirements might depend on the vision for the area, how buildings should be designed and other aspects. Often urban design, sustainability and other reports must be submitted with an application within a DDO.

Are there any specific requirements?

The statement of design objectives within a schedule must be responded to and considered. This might need specific reports prepared. 

How different are DDOs based on the local schedule?

The diversity of design issues covered in the DDO is outlined by some of the schedules across Victoria. For example:

  • Hospital Emergency Medical Services Helicopter Flight Path Protection – Melbourne City

  • City Link Exhaust Stack Environs – Yarra City

  • Dandenong Foothills: Foothills Backdrop and Ridgeline Area – Yarra Ranges Shire

  • Major Pipeline Infrastructure – Latrobe City

  • Port Campbell Commercial Precinct – Corangamite Shire

Each of these schedules consider unique local design characteristics to be considered for new buildings.

 

Schedule 1 to the DDO

To what areas does schedule 1 to the DDO apply?

This schedule – known as the DDO1 – Township Design – generally applies to residential areas in townships.

The DDO1 covers parts of Balnarring, Dromana, Hastings, McCrae, Mornington, Mount Eliza, Mount Martha, Rosebud, Rye, Safety Beach and Somerville.

This overlay generally applies to areas adjacent to the foreshore and commercial centres, and allows for a range of medium density residential developments.

What are the design objectives for the DDO1?

To ensure that new development has regard for the established streetscape and development pattern.

To protect shared viewlines where reasonable and practical.

To ensure that buildings are not visually obtrusive when viewed from surrounding streets and properties, foreshore areas, and main roads.

To ensure that subdivisions enable new buildings to integrate with the site and the surrounding area.

To ensure that subdivisions and developments have proper regard for heritage values.

To ensure that the traffic generated by medium density residential development does not impact residential streets or main roads.

Are there specific permit requirements for new buildings, land uses or other development in the DDO1?

A planning permit is required for any application that involves more than one dwelling, however, a single dwelling, extension, or outbuilding would only need a permit if it did not meet the general requirements by having:

  • A setback of less than 10 metres from certain zones or the Nepean Highway.

  • A wall height over 5.5 metres or a building height over 6 metres.

  • Earthworks (cut and/or fill) exceeding 1 metre (except for a swimming pool).

A building must have a maximum building height of no more than 10 metres and must contain no more than two storeys above natural ground level. 

There are no minimum lot sizes in the DDO1.

Please note: this sheet is intended to provide general information, it is recommended you contact council to ensure this advice is applicable to your property.

 

Schedule 2 to the DDO

To what areas does schedule 2 to the DDO apply?

This schedule – known as the DDO2 – Bayside and Village Design – generally applies to coastal and bayside residential areas and rural villages, and does not allow for medium or high density development.

The DDO2 covers parts of Balnarring, Blairgowrie, Flinders, Mount Eliza, Mount Martha, Point Leo, Portsea, Red Hill, Rye, Safety Beach, Shoreham, Sorrento and Tootgarook. 

In these areas a lower density and traffic contributes to the amenity of the area. As these areas have limited access to infrastructure, services and facilities including public transport, they are inappropriate for higher densities.

What are the design objectives for the DDO2?

To ensure that subdivision and development is responsive to the character of these areas.

To retain the substantial vegetation cover that is a feature of these areas. 

To ensure that new development has regard for the established streetscape and development pattern.

To protect shared viewlines where reasonable and practical.

To ensure that buildings are not visually obtrusive when viewed from surrounding streets and properties.

To ensure that subdivisions and developments proposals have proper regard for heritage values.

Please note: this is intended to provide general information, it is recommended you contact council to ensure this advice is applicable to your property.

Are there specific permit requirements for new buildings, land uses or other development in the DDO2?

A planning permit is required for any application that involves more than one dwelling. However, a single dwelling, extension, or outbuilding would only need a permit if it did not meet the general requirements by having: 

  • A wall height over 5.5 metres or a building height over 6 metres. 

  • Earthworks (cut and/or fill) exceeding 1 metre (except for a swimming pool). 

  • A setback of less than 10 metres from certain zones, main roads, and cliffs.

  • A setback of less than 7.5 metres from a front road or 3 metres from a side road.

  • Wall cladding of an unapproved material or a light or reflective colour (LRV more than 40%)

  • A relocatable or moveable building.

A planning permit is required for a fence if: 

  • The side or rear fence is more than 2 metres in height. 

  • The front fence is more than 1.8 metres in height or is less than 50% transparent.  

  • The fence is less than 6 metres from the foreshore or a cliff, or is constructed of fibro cement sheet materials. 

A building must have no more than two storeys  above natural ground level at any point.  Different areas have different maximum building heights, please contact council to confirm the maximum height for your property.

Generally, there must be no more than one dwelling on a lot, and for subdivisions all new lots must be at least 1,300 square metres, and must have minimum dimensions of 20 x 30 metres. There are some situations in which a smaller subdivision could be supported, please contact council to discuss your property.

 

Schedule 3 to the DDO

To what areas does schedule 3 to the DDO apply?

This schedule – known as the DDO3 – Coast and Landscape Design – generally applies to coastal villages, hillsides and clifftop areas, and does not allow for medium or high density development.

The DDO3 covers parts of Arthurs Seat, Balnarring, Balnarring Beach, Dromana, Flinders, McCrae, Merricks Beach, Mornington, Mount Eliza, Mount Martha, Point Leo, Portsea, Rosebud, Shoreham, Somers and Sorrento.

In these areas a lower density and traffic contributes to the amenity of the area. As these areas have limited access to infrastructure,  services and facilities including public transport, they are inappropriate for higher densities.

What are the design objectives for the DDO3?

To ensure that subdivision and development is responsive to the character of these areas.

To avoid higher densities of development in areas often prone to landslip, erosion or bushfires.

To retain the substantial vegetation cover that is a feature of these areas. 

To ensure that new development has regard for the established streetscape and development pattern.

To protect shared viewlines where reasonable and practical.

To ensure that buildings are not obtrusive when viewed from surrounding streets and properties.

To ensure that subdivisions and developments proposals have proper regard for heritage values.

To ensure that developments have regard for bushfire risk.

Please note: this sheet is intended to provide general information, it is recommended you contact council to ensure this advice is applicable to your property

Are there specific permit requirements for new buildings, land uses or other development in the DDO3?

A planning permit is required for any new dwelling. However, an extension or alteration to an existing dwelling, or an outbuilding would only need a permit if it did not meet the general requirements by having: 

  • Been located on a slope greater than 20% or on a ridge.

  • A wall height over 5.5 metres or a building height over 6 metres. 

  • Earthworks (cut and/or fill) exceeding 1 metre  (except for a swimming pool). 

  • A setback of less than 10 metres from certain zones, main roads, and cliffs.

  • A setback of less than 7.5 metres from a front road or 3 metres from a side road.

  • Wall cladding of an unapproved material or a light or reflective colour (LRV more than 40%)

  • A relocatable or moveable building.

A planning permit is required for a fence if: 

  • The side or rear fence is more than 2 metres in height. 

  • The front fence is more than 1.8 metres in height or is less than 50% transparent.  

  • The fence is less than 6 metres from the foreshore or a cliff, or is constructed of fibro  cement sheet materials. 

A building must have no more than two storeys  above natural ground level at any point. Different areas have different maximum building heights, so please contact council to confirm the maximum height for your property.

Generally, there must be no more than one dwelling on a lot, and for subdivisions all new lots must be at least 1,500 square metres, and each lot must have minimum dimensions of 25 x 35 metres. In some areas all new lots must be at least 4,000 square metres

 

Schedule 4 to the DDO

To what areas does schedule 4 to the DDO apply?

This schedule – known as the DDO4 – Environmental Design – generally applies to more environmentally sensitive residential areas, and does not allow for medium or high density development.

The DDO4 covers parts of Arthurs Seat, Bittern, Blairgowrie, Dromana, Mount Eliza, Mount Martha, Portsea, Rye, Somerville, Sorrento, St Andrews Beach, Tootgarook and Tyabb.

In these areas a lower density and traffic contributes to the amenity of the area. As these areas have limited access to infrastructure,  services and facilities including public transport, they are inappropriate for higher densities.

What are the design objectives for the DDO4?

To ensure that subdivision and development is responsive to the character and physical characteristics of these environmentally sensitive areas.

To avoid higher densities of development in areas often prone to landslip, erosion or bushfires, and to minimise earthworks and vegetation removal in steep and sandy conditions.

To retain the substantial vegetation cover that is a feature of these areas. 

To ensure that new development has regard for the established streetscape and development pattern.

To protect shared viewlines where reasonable and practical.

To ensure that buildings are not obtrusive when viewed from surrounding streets and properties.

To ensure that subdivisions and developments proposals have proper regard for heritage values.

Please note: this sheet is intended to provide general information, it is recommended you contact council to ensure this advice is applicable to your property.

Are there specific permit requirements for new buildings, land uses or other development in the DDO4?

A planning permit is required for any application  that involves more than one dwelling. However, a single dwelling, extension, or outbuilding would only need a permit if it did not meet the general requirements by having:

  • A wall height over 5.5 metres or a building height over 6 metres (in some areas a wall height over 4.5 metres or building height over 5 metres requires a permit so please contact council to confirm which is applicable to your property). 

  • Earthworks (cut and/or fill) exceeding 1 metre  (except for a swimming pool). 

  • A setback of less than 10 metres from certain zones, main roads, and cliffs.

  • A setback of less than 15 metres from a front road or 5 metres from a side road (unless the lot is less than 1,500 square metres, when a 7.5 metre setback is required).

  • Wall cladding of an unapproved material or a light or reflective colour (LRV more than 40%)

  • A relocatable or moveable building.

A planning permit is required for a fence if: 

  • The side or rear fence is more than 2 metres in height. 

  • The front fence is more than 1.8 metres in height or is less than 50% transparent.  

  • The fence is less than 6 metres from the foreshore or a cliff, or is constructed of fibro  cement sheet materials. 

A building must have no more than two storeys  above natural ground level at any point. Different areas have different maximum building heights, so please contact council to confirm the maximum height for your property.

Generally, there must be no more than one dwelling on a lot. There are different minimum lot sizes for subdivisions for different areas within the DDO4, so please contact council to confirm.

 

Schedule 5 to the DDO

To what areas does schedule 5 to the DDO apply?

This schedule – known as the DDO5 – Low Density – Wildcoast Protection Area – applies to environmentally sensitive low density residential areas in proximity to the Point Nepean and Mornington Peninsula National Parks.

The DDO5 covers parts of Blairgowrie, Portsea,  Rye and St Andrews Beach.

In these areas a lower density and traffic contributes to the amenity of the area. As these areas have limited access to infrastructure,  services and facilities including public transport, they are inappropriate for higher densities.

What are the design objectives for the DDO5?

To ensure that subdivision and housing design is appropriate for the environmentally sensitive Wildcoast protection area and is carried out with regard to the physical characteristics of each site, as well as the dunes and national parks.

To avoid higher densities of development and minimise earthworks in areas prone to instability and erosion.

To retain the substantial vegetation cover that is a feature of these areas. 

To ensure that new development has regard for the established streetscape and development pattern, and that buildings are not obtrusive when  viewed from surrounding streets and properties.

To protect shared viewlines where reasonable and practical.

To ensure that subdivisions and developments proposals have proper regard for heritage values.

Please note: this sheet is intended to provide general information, it is recommended you contact council to ensure this advice is applicable to your property.

Are there specific permit requirements for new buildings, land uses or other development in the DDO5?

A planning permit is required for any building or works, including single dwellings and extensions or alterations to existing dwellings.

A planning permit may not be required for a dependent person's unit, but only if it meets certain requirements.

Buildings and works should meet the following requirements (which can be varied with justification):

  • Located on land with a slope less than 20% and not on a ridge top.

  • Wall height less than 4.5 metres and building height less than 5 metres, with no rooftop deck or similar.

  • Earthworks (cut and/or fill) less than 1 metre.

  • A setback of at least 10 metres from certain zones.

  • A setback of at least 15 metres from a front road, 5 metres from a side road, and 2 metres from any other boundary.

  • Wall cladding of an approved material and not in a light or reflective colour (LRV less than 40%)

  • Not a relocatable or moveable building.

A planning permit is required for a fence if: 

  • The side or rear fence is more than 2 metres in height. 

  • The front fence is more than 1.8 metres in height or is less than 50% transparent.  

  • The fence is less than 10 metres from a public foreshore, or is constructed of fibro  cement sheet materials. 

A building must have no more than two storeys  above natural ground level at any point.

There must be no more than one dwelling on a lot, and the minimum lot size is 5,000 square metres

 

Schedule 6 to the DDO

To what areas does schedule 6 to the DDO apply?

This schedule – known as the DDO6 – Low Density – Landscape – applies to low density residential areas, generally in more rural locations on the periphery of townships.

The DDO6 covers parts of Balnarring Beach, Bittern, Crib Point, Dromana, Flinders, Hastings, Merricks, Merricks Beach, Mornington, Mount Eliza, Mount Martha, Point Leo, Rosebud, Rye, Shoreham, Somers, Somerville, Tootgarook and Tyabb.

In these areas more intensive settlement would adversely affect significant landscape values and is to be avoided.

What are the design objectives for the DDO6?

To ensure that low density subdivision and housing design is responsive to the characteristics and landscape values of these areas.

To ensure that development densities are compatible with the environmental and infrastructure capacities of these areas.

To retain the substantial vegetation cover that is a feature of these areas. 

To ensure that new development has regard for the established streetscape and development pattern.

To protect shared viewlines where reasonable and practical.

To ensure that subdivisions enable new buildings to be integrated with their site and the surrounding area.

Please note: this sheet is intended to provide general information, it is recommended you contact council to ensure this advice is applicable to your property.

Are there specific permit requirements for new buildings, land uses or other development in the DDO6?

A planning permit is required for any application  that involves more than one dwelling. However, a single dwelling, extension, or outbuilding would only need a permit if it did not meet the general requirements by having: 

  • A building height over 8 metres or more than 2 storeys including rooftop decks or similar.

  • Earthworks (cut and/or fill) exceeding 1 metre  (except for a swimming pool). 

  • In Somerville only, a setback of less than 50 metres from the south side of Bungower Road or less than 40 metres from the north side of Eramosa Road West.

  • A setback of less than 25 metres from any road or 10 metres from any boundary.

  • Wall cladding of an unapproved material or a light or reflective colour (LRV more than 40%).

  • A relocatable or moveable building.

A planning permit is not required for a fence.

Outside the Urban Growth Boundary: there must be no more than one dwelling on a lot.

Within the Urban Growth Boundary: a planning permit may be granted for a second dwelling on a lot.

The average area of new lots within a subdivision must be no less than 1 hectare, and each lot must be able to contain a rectangle with a minimum dimension of 50 metres. Each lot must have an area of at least 4,000 square metres. Battle-axe lots should have a minimum frontage of 20 metres

 

Schedule 18 to the DDO

To what areas does schedule 18 to the DDO apply?

This schedule – known as the DDO18 – applies to the Mount Eliza Woodland Area, and seeks to recognise and protect the distinctive character of this area.

In this area a lower density and traffic contributes to the amenity of the area. As the area is subject to erosion, instability, and bushfires, and has limited access to infrastructure, services and facilities including public transport, it is  inappropriate for higher densities. 

The DDO18 has four precincts (Precincts 1-4).

What are the design objectives for the DDO18?

To retain the substantial vegetation cover that is a feature of the area, and protect the landscape character, vegetation-dominated setting, and indigenous vegetation of the area.

To ensure that new development has regard for the established streetscape and development pattern, and ensure that subdivisions allow new buildings to be integrated with the site and surrounding area.

To protect shared viewlines where reasonable and practical.

To ensure that buildings are not obtrusive when  viewed from surrounding streets and properties, and that new buildings or extensions do not dominate the streetscape or wider landscape setting.

To maintain a relatively low site coverage to allow adequate space for vegetation and landscaping, with generous front and side setbacks.

To ensure that subdivision and development proposals have regard for heritage values.

Please note: this is intended to provide general information, it is recommended you contact council to ensure this advice is applicable to your property.

Are there specific permit requirements for new buildings, land uses or other development in the DDO18?

A planning permit is required for any application in Precinct 1, and an application in any precinct that involves more than one dwelling. However, in Precincts 2-4 a single dwelling, extension, or small outbuilding would only need a permit if it did not meet the general requirements by having:

  • A wall height over 5.5 metres or a building height over 6 metres. 

  • Earthworks (cut and/or fill) exceeding 1 metre . 

  • A setback of less than 10 metres from certain zones, main roads, and cliffs.

  • Different lot sizes have different setback requirements, so please contact council to confirm the requirements for setbacks.

  • Wall cladding of an unapproved material or a light or reflective colour (LRV more than 40%)

  • A relocatable or moveable building, or a rooftop deck or similar.

  • Precinct 1-2: site coverage less than 10% and permeability less than 20%.

  • Precinct 3-4: site coverage less than 15% and permeability less than 25%.

A planning permit is required for a fence if: 

  • The side or rear fence is more than 1.8 metres in height. 

  • The front fence is more than 1.5 metres in height or is less than 70% transparent.  

  • The fence is constructed of fibro cement sheet materials. 

A building must have no more than two storeys  above natural ground level at any point. 

Generally, there must be no more than one dwelling on a lot, with some exceptions for very small second dwellings on larger lots (please contact council for specifics).

The minimum lot size is 2,000 square metres, with dimensions of 25 x 35 metres.

 

Schedule 24 to the DDO

To what areas does schedule 24 to the DDO apply?

This schedule – known as the DDO24 – applies to the Beleura Hill area in Mornington, and seeks to maintain the landscape and ‘hillside’ character of the area and its function as a landmark and green backdrop for Mornington.

The DDO24 has three precincts (Precincts 1-3).

What are the design objectives for the DDO24?

To ensure that subdivision and building design is responsive to the existing and preferred character of the area.

To retain the substantial vegetation cover that is a feature of the area.

To ensure that new development has regard for the established streetscape and development pattern, and ensure that subdivisions allow new buildings to be integrated with the site and surrounding area.

To protect shared viewlines where reasonable and practical.

To ensure that buildings are not obtrusive when  viewed from surrounding streets and properties.

Please note: this sheet is intended to provide general information, it is recommended you contact council to ensure this advice is applicable to your property.

Are there specific permit requirements for new buildings, land uses or other development in the DDO24?

A planning permit is required for any application  that involves more than one dwelling. However, a single dwelling, extension, or outbuilding would  only need a permit if it did not meet the general  requirements by having:

  • Earthworks (cut and/or fill) exceeding 1 metre . 

  • More than one crossover.

  • A minimum front setback less than 7.5 metres (side and rear setbacks vary by precinct so please contact council to confirm).

  • A building height over 8 metres.

  • Site coverage more than 40% in Precinct 1 or more than 50% in Precincts 2-3.

  • Private open space less than 60 square metres in Precinct 1 or less than 40 square metres in Precincts 2-3.

A planning permit is required for a front fence if it is more than 1.5 metres in in height. 

A building must have a maximum building height of no more than 10 metres and must contain no more than two storeys above natural ground level.

  • In Precinct 1 the minimum average lot size for subdivision is 700 square metres, and there must be no more than one dwelling per 700 square metres.

  • In Precinct 2  the minimum average lot size for subdivision is 500 square metres, and there must be no more than one dwelling per 500 square metres.

  • In Precinct 3 the minimum average lot size for subdivision is 400 square metres, and there must be no more than one dwelling per 400 square metres.